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St. James the Mutilated

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St. James the Mutilated, also called St. James Intercisius (which is just Latin for "cut into pieces") was, as his name suggests, cut into 28 pieces as part of his martyrdom. He didn't die until his head was finally removed, and never denied his faith. His followers absconded with his relics after the king wouldn't let them have them, and eventually ended up in Portugal.   Lifetime:  ?? to 421 Region:  Persia Patronages:  Lost vocations; Torture victims Iconograpy:  Man cut into pieces; Persian attire Feast Day:  November 27

St. Gregory of Neocaesarea

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"If you have faith as small as a mustard seed, you can say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,’ and it will move." - Jesus to the Apostles, Matthew 17:20.  St. Gregory of Neocaesarea (also called St. Gregory the Wonder-Worker or St. Gregory Thaumaturgus) took this passage very literally. Through his prayers, and entire mountain was moved to make way for a church to be built!   Lifetime:  ~213 to ~270 Region:  Modern Turkey Patronages:  Earthquakes; Floods; Forgotten causes Iconograpy:  Bishop's attire; White hair/beard; Holding a book Feast Day:  November 17

St. Jude the Apostle

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St. Jude, one of the 12 apostles, is well-known today as the patron saint of lost causes or desperate situations. While his role in scripture is minimal and not much is known for certain about his life, tradition adds a lot of story to his life. He is the author of one of the Epistles in addition to being named in the Gospel of Luke as well as the book of Acts.   Lifetime:  1st century Region:  Galilee; Armenia Patronages:  Lost causes; Hospitals; Armenia Iconograpy:  Oar; Club; Axe; Pentecost flame Feast Day:  October 28 (Western); June 19 & 30 (Eastern)

St. Pelagia the Pentitent

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There is some debate about whether St. Pelagia the Penitent (also known as Pelagia of Antioch or Pelagia the Harlot) was a historical person, as well as how many Pelagias there really were. At one point, she shared her October 8 feast day with two other saints also named Pelagia!   Lifetime:  ~3-400s Region:  Antioch Patronages:  Actresses; Dancers; Performers Iconograpy:  Red cloak Feast Day:  October 8

St. Gabriel the Archangel

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Along with Michael and Raphael , Gabriel is one of the three archangels mentioned by name in Holy Scripture. He is the only one featured in the Gospel stories, as it is Gabriel who shares the news with Mary that she will give birth to the Christ.  In the Eastern church, Gabriel gets two feast days dedicated solely to him (plus a third shared with the other angels). One of those is the day after the feast of the Annunciation.   Lifetime:  Eternity Region:  Heaven & Earth Patronages:  Communications; Messengers; Clerics; Diplomats Iconograpy:  Angel wings; Mirror reflecting X; Lilies; Trumpet Feast Day:  September 29 (with other Archangels) (Western); November 8 (with other Archangels) (Eastern); March 24 (Eastern); July 13 (Eastern) Since everything we know about Gabriel comes from the Gospel of Luke, I thought the best way to introduce him is to simply share those passages. Here Gabriel tells Zechariah that his wife is pregnant with John the Baptist: Now at the time of the incens

St. John Chrysostom

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St. John Chrysostom was one of the most prolific writers of the early church, and one of the most influential speakers in his time. He is widely celebrated by Christians who venerate saints, but most especially by Byzantine Christians, who recognize him as one of the three holy hierarchs and celebrate him on three separate feast days. Lifetime:  ~347 to 407 Region:  Antioch (modern Turkey) Patronages:  Education; Epilepsy; Lecturers; Constantinople Iconograpy:  Bishop vestments; Gospel book; Dove Feast Day:  September 13 (Western); November 13 (Eastern) John was born in Antioch, and while it is unknown whether his parents were Christian, his father was a high-ranking officer in the military. His father died when John was still a baby, so he was raised by his mother. Using her influence, she had John tutored by a well-known pagan tutor who specialized in rhetoric and taught John how to speak and read Greek. John eventually became a lawyer, but at some point began to embrace the Christia

St. Mamas of Caesarea

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St. Mamas (also spelled Mammes, Mammas, and Mammet) was martyred when he was only 15 years old. But his short life was riddled with miracles and bold acts of faith, though the specifics vary a bit in the different regions that venerate him. Lifetime:  ~259 to ~275 Region:  Cappadocia (modern Turkey) Patronages: Nursing babies; Broken bones; Hernias Iconograpy:  Lion; Lamb; Red cloak Feast Day:  August 17 (Western); September 2 (Eastern) Mamas was born in prison. His parents (who are also both canonized saints) were Christian, and were arrested for their faith while his mother was pregnant with him. Shortly after his birth, both his parents were killed, leaving him an orphan. He was then adopted by a rich Christian widow, who raised Mamas in the faith of his parents. Mamas was educated and took well to his studies, achieving far beyond his years. Even as a youth, Mamas converted many to his faith through personal example and discussions.  When the governor learned of all the people who